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Public trust in Australian charities: Accounting for cause and effect

Third Sector Review
Volume 21 Issue 2 (Nov 2015)

Abstract: This paper reports on a study of the key determinants of public trust in charitable organisations, using survey data commissioned by the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission. Data analysis used partial least squares structural equation modelling to examine both antecedents of trust and the inf luence of trust on charitable donative intentions. We found that people tend to trust charities with which they are familiar, and which are transparent in their reporting. Organisational size, importance, reputation and national significance were also antecedents of trust. People are more likely to volunteer or donate to charities they trust. The practical implications of this are that charities seeking to enhance their volunteer and donation base should pay attention to their marketing, reputation and disclosure activities, as well as to doing good work on an ongoing basis in the community. Theoretically, the implications are that transparency and reputation do not result directly in donations and volunteering, but they do create trust, and it is trust which then leads to donations and volunteering.

To cite this article: Furneaux, Craig and Wymer, Walter. Public trust in Australian charities: Accounting for cause and effect [online]. Third Sector Review, Vol. 21, No. 2, Nov 2015: 99-127. Availability: <http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=710497957462155;res=IELAPA> ISSN: 1323-9163. [cited 23 Jun 17].

Personal Author: Furneaux, Craig; Wymer, Walter; Source: Third Sector Review, Vol. 21, No. 2, Nov 2015: 99-127 DOI: Document Type: Journal Article ISSN: 1323-9163 Subject: Charities; Research--Methodology; Regression analysis; Voluntarism; Peer Reviewed: Yes

Database: APAFT